Pathology: Contraindications and Indications for Manual Therapy

 

Look up over 150 medical conditions below


 

The following is an excerpt from ‘A Massage Therapist’s Guide to Pathology’ by Ruth Werner and Ben E. Benjamin.

It is posted on this website with the kind permission of the publisher based on the following conditions:

·      No printed or electronic copies of this posted text shall be made, except for the private usage of the reader

·      Copyright remains with Lippincot William & Wilkins, 1998

·      Class room reproduction to students – either directly from this webpage or from the book itself – requires also prior permission of the publisher.

·      If this webpage text is hyperlinked from another domain, it is important that the link goes to the very beginning of this text (i.e. before and not after these copyright notes).

·      Robert Schleip highly recommends the purchase of this book by Ruth Werner and Ben E. Benjamin for any practitioner of deep tissue manipulation as well as other somatic practitioners. The following excerpt is only a small portion of the book, which is at the appendix of the book, called ‘Quick Reference Chart’. The main part of this book (489 pages) contains a much more detailed description of most of the conditions. The chart below often includes under ‘condition name’ a reference to a specific page number in the book, which then contains usually 2 to 4 pages of detailed information about this condition and why and how massage might be contraindicated or indicated, as well as specific cautionary notes and recommendations for the practitioner.

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Text of Excerpt:

Quick Reference Charts:  Read this first !

This appendix provides a reference for massage students and practitioners who need fast answers to simple questions. It is not intended as a substitute for reading the complete article for each condition, and will not provide enough information to make a well informed decision without that background. Some conditions, however, are not detailed in text. These have been marked with an *.

Several things are important to remember while using these quick reference charts:

  The label "indicated" does not mean that a condition will always be improved by massage. It means that massage will not make the situation worse, and the support and comfort massage gives can certainly be beneficial to the client, if not to the particular condition.

  The term "massage" refers to circulatory‑based massage that has a direct effect on blood and lymph flow. If a condition is labeled "contraindicated," it's usually because the influence of massage on circulation would have a negative impact on the client. This does not necessarily rule out touch altogether, however, and many conditions that contraindicate vigorous circulatory massage are perfectly appropriate for less mechanically based bodywork modalities.

  When massage is considered appropriate or indicated, it is a systemic recommendation. When massage is contraindicated, guidelines for whether those cautions are local or systemic have been provided.

  The specific kind of impact that massage may have on various conditions is discussed in the complete articles rather than here in the abbreviated  version.

The most important thing to remember is that it is impossible to make a foolproof judgment about whether massage is a good choice strictly from a book. Every client is different; every practitioner has a different kind of approach. These recommendations are just that: recommendations that may help to shape well‑informed decisions about the appropriateness of massage.

 

When clicking on any of the following links, be patient- it takes a while for all the information to come up for you.

 

Abortion

Acne

Acromegaly

Alcoholism

Alzheimer´s Disease

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Anemia

Aneurysm

Ankylosing Spondylitis

Appendicitis

Asthma

Atherosclerosis

Baker`s Cysts

Bell`s Palsy

Boils

Breast Cancer

Bronchitis

Bunions

Burns

Bursitis

 

Cancer

Candidiasis

Carpal Tunnel Syndrom

Cerebral Palsy

Chondromalacia /Patellofemoral Syndrom

Chorea

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Cirrhosis

Colon Cancer

Common Cold

Contractures

COPD / Emphysema

Cysts

Crohn´s Disease

 

Decubitus Ulcers

Dermatitis / Eczema

Diabetes Mellitus

Dislocations

Diverticulosis / Diverticulitis

Dupuytren`s Contracture

Dysmenorrhea

Edema

Embolism or Thrombus

Encephalitis

Endometriosis

Epilepsy

 

Erysipelas

Fatigue

Fever

Fibroid Tumors

Fibromyalgia

Fractures

Fungal Infections

Gallstones

Ganglion Cysts

Gastroenteritis

Glomerulonephritis

Gout

Guillain Barre Syndrome

Headaches

 

Heart Attack

Hematoma

Hemophilia

Hepatitis

Hernia

Herniated Disc

Herpes Simplex

Herpes Zoster

HIV/AIDS

Hives

Hodgkin`s Disease

Hyperesthesia

Hypertension

Hyperthyroidism

 

Hypothyroidism

Ichthyosis

Impetigo

Inflammation

Influenza

Insomnia

Interstitial Cystitis

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Jaundice

Kidney Stones

Lice and Mites

Liver, Enlarged

Lung Cancer

Lupus

Lyme Disease

Lymphangitis

 

Marfan`s Syndrome

Meningitis

Moles

Multiple Sclerosis

Myasthenia Gravis

Myositis Ossificans

Neuritis

Open Wounds and Sores

Osgood-Schlatter Disease

Osteoarthritis

Osteogenesis Imperfecti

Osteoporosis

Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian Cysts

Paget´s Disease

Parkinson`s Disease

 

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peritonitis

Pes Planus

Plantar Fasciitis

Pneumonia

Polio

Post Polio Syndrome

Postoperative Situations

Postural Deviations

Pregnancy

Premenstrual Syndrome

Prostate Cancer

Psoriasis

Pyelonephritis

Raynaud’s Syndrome

 

Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy

Renal Failure

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Scar Tissue

Sciatica

Scleroderma

Seizure Disorders

Septic Arthritis

Shin Splints

Sinusitis

Skin Cancer

Spasms, Cramps

Spinal Cord Injury

Spondylolisthesis

Spondylosis

Sprains

Strains

Stroke

Substance Abuse

 

 

Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

Tendinitis

Tenosynovitis

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

Thrombophlebitis or Deep Vein Thrombosis

Torticollis

Trigeminal Neuralgia

Tuberculosis

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcers

Urinary Tract Infection

Varicose Veins

Warts

Whiplash

 

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